A bioecological content analysis: An analysis technique rooted in the bioecological model for human development

Keywords: Bioecological content analysis, Bioecological model for human development, Life story research, Matrix, PPCT-model

Abstract

A bioecological content analysis is an analysis technique rooted in the bioecological theory of human development and the Process–Person–Context–Time (PPCT) model. In this article, we outline what a bioecological content analysis is and provide guidelines to researchers, students and others who want to use it in large or small scale life story oriented research on such matters as children with special needs and their families, early intervention and early childhood special education. A discussion of advantages and disadvantages of the bioecological content analysis is provided.

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Published
2019-12-31
How to Cite
Lundqvist, J., & Sandström, M. (2019). A bioecological content analysis: An analysis technique rooted in the bioecological model for human development. International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education, 11(2), 194-206. https://doi.org/10.20489/intjecse.670478